Linkspam Whilst Trying Not to Screw Up

Right now I’m writing what’s probably the most difficult review I’ve had to do yet. Last week’s review of Federations was quite difficult, and this week’s is actually harder, in that it’ll be quite easy for me to put my foot in my mouth.

And the consequences of that would be pretty bad, I’m guessing, so there’s a bit of pressure. If I can get through this, I suspect I’ll have reached some kind of landmark in reviewing, and can cover a certain manga bookended series… but never mind that.

Today’s linkage (some of which may be a bit old):

Whatever: D-Day + 65 Years

John Scalzi offers some thoughts on D-Day’s passage from memory into history, links to a touching CNN interview with one of the veterans from that day, and the comment thread is as usual starting to pick up.

The Daily Dish: The Feelings of Animals

Why is it that bloggers like Andrew Sullivan can come up with more interesting and informative titles than hard-core news journalists? Whose jobs used to depend on that kind of thing?

Actually, this is in the interest section, so probably less hard-core. Sullivan links to New York Times: Findngs – In That Tucked Tail, Real Pangs of Regret?

Unique title, informative as whut? However, the article is quite good.

orgtheory.net: nixon’s revenge

The Republicans like to think of themselves as the party of Reagan, but this article posits that it’s more the party of Nixon. You poor bastards. Hat tip to Andrew Sullivan of the Daily Dish.

Guardian.co.uk: Two Unpublished Poirot Short Stories Found…

Not one, but two: “The Mystery of the Dog’s Ball”, which isn’t as bad as you think—maybe—it became Dumb Witness later in life; and “The Capture of Cereberus”, which would have completed The Labours of Hercules, Poirot’s last 12 cases. (He’s one of mystery’s great detectives who died, so this is more a reference to “last in his life” rather than “last in Christie’s life” although that appears to have been true as well.)

I love the subtitle of this article: “Fan taught himself to read author’s ‘bloody awful handwriting’ to unlock mystery contained within 73 notebooks at Devon house”.

HarperCollins has the ball on this one.

Hat tip to TYWKIWDBI ((Short for Things You Wouldn’t Know If We Didn’t Blog Incessantly.)), one of my favorite blogs.

Advertisements